Mobilization pg. 2

Constitutional equality a right of woman: or, A consideration of the various relations which she sustains as a necessary part of the body of society and humanity; with her duties to herself--together with a review of the Constitution of the United States, showing that the right to vote is guaranteed to all citizens.

Constitutional equality a right of woman

Lady Tennessee Claflin Cook (1845-1923)

Constitutional equality a right of woman: or, A consideration of the various relations which she sustains as a necessary part of the body of society and humanity; with her duties to herself--together with a review of the Constitution of the United States, showing that the right to vote is guaranteed to all citizens.

New York: Woodhull, Claflin, & Co., 1871.

Cook was a suffragist and one of the first women to open a Wall Street brokerage firm. Here she argues that “both sexes are born equal, possessed of the same essential germinal qualities of character, conscience and intellect, and entitled to the same blessing of growth and development, the reception of which would conduce to their continual equality.”

DeGolyer Library, General Collection, JK1901 .C7 1871

An appeal to the women of the United States by the National Woman Suffrage and Educational Committee, Washington, D.C.

An appeal to the women of the United States by the National Woman Suffrage and Educational Committee, Washington, D.C.

National Woman Suffrage and Educational Committee, Washington, D.C.

An appeal to the women of the United States by the National Woman Suffrage and Educational Committee, Washington, D.C.

Hartford: Case, Lockwood & Brainard, Printers, 1871.

The National Woman Suffrage and Educational Committee was created to coordinate the fight for women's rights through the country, distribute publications to assist in those efforts, and appeal for donations for a printing fund. The Appeal contains a "Declaration and Pledge of the Women of the United States concerning their Right to and their Use of the Elective Franchise," which opens:

"We, the undersigned, believing that the sacred rights and privileges of citizenship in this Republic were guaranteed to us by the original Constitution, and that these rights are confirmed and more clearly established by the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments, so that we can no longer refuse solemn responsibilities thereof, do hereby pledge ourselves to accept the duties of the franchise in our several States, so soon as all legal restrictions are removed."

DeGolyer Library, Pamphlet Collection, JK1896 .N25 1871

 “Some Remarkable American Women, at the Bar, in the Pulpit, and on the Dramatic and Operatic Stages.”

“Some Remarkable American Women, at the Bar, in the Pulpit, and on the Dramatic and Operatic Stages.”

“Some Remarkable American Women, at the Bar, in the Pulpit, and on the Dramatic and Operatic Stages.”

New York: Frank Leslie Pub. House, August 1880.

“Some Remarkable American Women” features image of Miss Phebe Couzins addressing the National Democratic Convention of 1876, in St. Louis. Couzins was one of the first female lawyers in the United States. Other woman highlighted in this article include: Mrs. Maggie Van Cott, Rev. Phebe A. Hannaford, Miss Charlotte Crabtree, Sojourner Truth, Mrs. Mary J. Young, Mrs. Belva A. Lockwood, Maggie Mitchell, Clara Louise Kellogg, Clara Morris, and Mary Anderson.

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

Daughters of America, or, Women of the century.

Daughters of America, or, Women of the century.

Phebe A. Hanaford (1829-1921)

Daughters of America, or, Women of the century.

Augusta, Me.: True and Co., circa 1882-1883.

Phebe Ann Coffin Hanaford was a Christian Universalist minister and biographer who was active in championing universal suffrage and women's rights. This work attempts to record the life and times of hundreds of remarkable women including religious and spiritual women, women of the American Revolution, wife of presidents, women leaders in philanthropy and society, poets, scientists and educators.

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

The Woman Suffrage Cook Book, Containing Thoroughly Tested and Reliable recipes for Cooking, Directions for the Care of the Sick, and Practical Suggestions.

The Woman Suffrage Cook Book, Containing Thoroughly Tested and Reliable recipes for Cooking, Directions for the Care of the Sick, and Practical Suggestions.

Hattie Burr

The Woman Suffrage Cook Book, Containing Thoroughly Tested and Reliable recipes for Cooking, Directions for the Care of the Sick, and Practical Suggestions.

Boston, 1890.

The Woman Suffrage Cook Book contains recipes by more than 164 different women. Copies of this cookbook were sold to raise funds for the suffrage movement, and put the words of its leaders in the homes of everyday housewives. A carefully curated selection of tried and tested recipes ranging from breads and teacakes to salads, puddings, meats and vegetables, is followed by eminent opinions on woman’s suffrage, including quotes by Abraham Lincoln, Charles Sumner, William Lloyd Garrison, Lydia Marie Child, and Louisa May Alcott.

“Woman’s suffrage is undoubtedly coming, and I for one expect a great deal of good to result from it.”  –Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

"Common Sense" Applied to Woman Suffrage; a statement of the reasons which justify the demand to extend the suffrage to women, with consideration of the arguments against such enfranchisement, and with special reference to the issue presented to the New York State convention of 1894.

"Common Sense" Applied to Woman Suffrage; a statement of the reasons which justify the demand to extend the suffrage to women, with consideration of the arguments against such enfranchisement, and with special reference to the issue presented to the New York State convention of 1894.

Mary Corinna Putnam Jacobi, M.D. (1842-1906)

"Common Sense" Applied to Woman Suffrage; a statement of the reasons which justify the demand to extend the suffrage to women, with consideration of the arguments against such enfranchisement, and with special reference to the issue presented to the New York State convention of 1894.

New York & London: G.P. Putnam's Sons. The Knickerbocker Press, 1894.

In this text Dr. Jacobi traces the history of the American suffrage movement and offers persuasive arguments for the cause. She notes the inequities of the present social and political state and offers suffrage as the remedy.

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

The woman-suffrage movement in the United States, a study; by a lawyer.

The woman-suffrage movement in the United States, a study; by a lawyer.

The woman-suffrage movement in the United States, a study; by a lawyer.

Boston, Arena Publishing Company, 1895.

Dedicated “To my mother whose mind moved the hand that held the pen.” From an unknown author, this work examines the suffrage movement through the legal issues of marriage, divorce, taxation and religion. According to the author, “female suffrage is based on the assumption that the sexes are equal in all thigs personal, legal, and political…” (pg. 64).

DeGolyer Library, General Collection, JK1901 .W84

Women and Economics. A Study of the Economic Relation Between Men and Women as a Factor in Social Evolution.

Women and Economics. A Study of the Economic Relation Between Men and Women as a Factor in Social Evolution.

Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935)

Women and Economics. A Study of the Economic Relation Between Men and Women as a Factor in Social Evolution.

Boston: Small, Maynard & Company, 1898.

Charlotte Perkins Stetson Gilman was a feminist, author and lecturer. In this work Gilman drew on history, sociology, anthropology, and psychology and used an evolutionary perspective to explore women's subordinate status in society in the past and present. She believed women were undervalued because the essential work they performed of cooking, cleaning and child care was unpaid.

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

Woman’s Tribune

Woman’s Tribune.

Woman’s Tribune.

Washington, D.C., October 6, 1900.

The Woman's Tribune was an American newspaper founded in Beatrice, Nebraska, by women's suffrage activist Clara Bewick Colby. It was the official publication of the Nebraska Woman Suffrage Association. Throughout its run, its slogan was "Equality before the Law.” It was published in Beatrice, Nebraska, and in Washington, D.C. until Colby moved to Portland, Oregon in 1904. It ceased publication in 1909. [Reproduction]

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

“Woman in the Home.”

“Woman in the Home.”

Susan Walker FitzGerald (1871-1943).

“Woman in the Home.”

Baltimore, Maryland: Rollman & Schloss., circa 1908.

Produced by the Woman Suffrage Party of the City of New York in support of the women's suffrage movement, FitzGerald argues that “women are, by nature and training, housekeepers. Let them have a hand in the city’s housekeeping, even if they introduce an occasional house-cleaning.” Fitzgerald was heavily involved in the suffrage movement and in progressive political organizations. In 1923, she became one of the first two women elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives.

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner