Orators pg. 2

An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans

An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans.

Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880)

An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans.

Boston: Allen & Ticknor, 1833.

Lydia Maria Child was a noted abolitionist, women's rights advocate, scholar and popular author. This publication was the first book of the American abolitionist movement, and it is one of the key documents in the movement.

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

Anti-Slavery Catechism

Anti-Slavery Catechism.

Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880)

Anti-Slavery Catechism.

Newburyport: Charles Whipple, 1836.

Lydia Maria Child was one of the first American women to make a career from her writing. She completed her first novel at the age of 22. In the Anti-Slavery Catechism, Child has appropriated a format usually reserved for religion, thereby infusing her subject with the piety of religion.

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

The American Frugal Housewife. Dedicated to Those Who Are Not Ashamed of Economy

The American Frugal Housewife.

Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880)

The American Frugal Housewife. Dedicated to Those Who Are Not Ashamed of Economy.

Boston: American Stationers' Company, 1836.

Originally published in 1829, this domestic manual, The American Frugal Housewife, contains Child’s household hints, cheap recipes, and budgeting information. It is unique in that she wrote it for lower and middle class women. In her introduction Child’s states: "Books of this kind have usually been written for the wealthy: I have written for the poor ...I have attempted to teach how money can be saved, not how it can be enjoyed."

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

The Right Way and the Safe Way, Proved by Emancipation in the British West Indies, and Elsewhere...

The Right Way and the Safe Way, Proved by Emancipation in the British West Indies, and Elsewhere...

Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880)

The Right Way and the Safe Way, Proved by Emancipation in the British West Indies, and Elsewhere...

New York: [s.n.], 1862.

Child’s vehement anti-slavery position was greeted with hostility and a boycott of her books. This pamphlet calls for immediate emancipation.

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

Letters of Child, Biographical Introduction by John G. Whittier Appendix by Wendell Phillips

Letters of Child.

Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880)

Letters of Child, Biographical Introduction by John G. Whittier Appendix by Wendell Phillips.

Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1883.

The appendix comprises a bibliographical list of Mrs. Child's writings and Phillips' remarks at her funeral in 1880. This selection of letters emphasized Child's role as an abolitionist.

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

Free Religion. Report of Addresses at a Meeting Held in Boston, May 30, 1867, To Consider the Conditions, Wants, and Prospects of Free Religion in America. Together with the Constitution of the Free Religious Association There Organized

Free Religion. 

Lucretia Mott (1793-1880)

Free Religion. Report of Addresses at a Meeting Held in Boston, May 30, 1867, To Consider the Conditions, Wants, and Prospects of Free Religion in America. Together with the Constitution of the Free Religious Association There Organized.

Boston: Adams & Co., 1867.

This report prints her address in full, as well as prints remarks by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Robert Owen, Oliver Johnson, Francis Abbot, et al.

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

Lucretia Mott [Signed and Inscribed Cabinet Photograph]

Lucretia Mott [Signed and Inscribed Cabinet Photograph].

Lucretia Mott [Signed and Inscribed Cabinet Photograph].

[s.l.]: I.G. Tyson, circa 1879.

Original cabinet photograph of noted suffrage and abolitionist leader, Lucretia Mott. On the back is written, "Truth for authority, not authority for truth." Mott was a Quaker minister, pioneer in the women's rights movement, abolitionist, and founder of Free Religious Association.

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

Life and Letters

Life and Letters.

James Mott (1788 – 1868) and Lucretia Mott (1793-1880)

Life and Letters.

Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company; Cambridge: The Riverside Press, 1884.

This first edition of Life and Letters, edited by their granddaughter Anna Davis Hallowell, is the first complete biography of Lucretia Mott, who was a pioneer in the reform movements of the 19th-century including abolition, suffrage, and temperance.

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

Address in favor of universal suffrage, for the election of delegates to the Constitutional Convention. Before the Judiciary Committees of the Legislature of New York, in the Assembly chamber, January 23, 1867, in behalf of the American Equal Rights Association

Address in favor of universal suffrage, for the election of delegates to the Constitutional Convention. Before the Judiciary Committees of the Legislature of New York, in the Assembly chamber, January 23, 1867, in behalf of the American Equal Rights Association.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), American Equal Rights Association.

Address in favor of universal suffrage, for the election of delegates to the Constitutional Convention. Before the Judiciary Committees of the Legislature of New York, in the Assembly chamber, January 23, 1867, in behalf of the American Equal Rights Association.

Albany: Weed, Parsons and Company, printers, 1867.

An argument for universal suffrage and references to the Woman question given by Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

DeGolyer Library, Pamphlet Collection, HQ1114 .S8

Elizabeth Cady Stanton [carte de visite]

Elizabeth Cady Stanton [carte de visite].

Elizabeth Cady Stanton [carte de visite].

New York: Sarony & Co. Photographers, circa 1870.

Portrait of Stanton taken by artist Napoleon Sarony (1821-1896). Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902) was the daughter of a lawyer and shaped by her father who desired another son. She became interested in abolitionism, temperance, and the women’s rights movements.

 From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

The Great Orators
Orators pg. 2