Orators pg. 3

“An Appeal to the Women of New York,” The Freethinkers’ Magazine

“An Appeal to the Women of New York,” The Freethinkers’ Magazine.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902)

“An Appeal to the Women of New York,” The Freethinkers’ Magazine.

Chicago, Illinois: H.L. Green, 1894.

In the summer of 1894, New York State held a convention to revise its Constitution. In her article Stanton calls upon the women of New York to demand suffrage. “If the women of this State understood the significance of this right of suffrage, they would, with united voice, make the demand now.”

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

“Suffrage a Natural Right,” The Open Court, February 1, 1894

“Suffrage a Natural Right,” The Open Court, February 1, 1894.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902)

“Suffrage a Natural Right,” The Open Court, February 1, 1894.

Chicago, Illinois: Open Court Publishing Company, 1894.

Susan B. Anthony read this this speech, written by Stanton, before the final session of World’s Congress on Government. The lecture did not appear in print until Open Court published it as an article in 1894, and reprinted it as a pamphlet.

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

Eighty Years and More Reminiscences of Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Eighty Years and More Reminiscences of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902)

Eighty Years and More Reminiscences of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

New York: European Publishing Company, 1898.

First edition inscribed: "The few have no right to the luxuries of life, while the many are denied its necessities."

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

The Woman's Bible. Part I Comments on Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy. Part II Comments on the Old and New Testaments from Joshua to Revelation

The Woman's Bible. 

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902)

The Woman's Bible. Part I Comments on Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy. Part II Comments on the Old and New Testaments from Joshua to Revelation.

New York: European Publishing Company, 1895, 1898.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, suffragist, journalist and lecturer, worked all of her life for the advancement of women's rights, becoming increasingly more radical in the last third of her life. Perhaps most radical was the publication of this book, The Woman’s Bible, which challenged organized religion by including feminist interpretations (and rewrites) of many passages.

From the Helen LaKelly Hunt Collection of American Women Reformers and Writers

Advertisement for Fairy Soap appearing in Cosmopolitan Magazine

Advertisement for Fairy Soap appearing in Cosmopolitan Magazine.

Advertisement for Fairy Soap appearing in Cosmopolitan Magazine.

New York: Cosmopolitan Magazine Co., [Circa 1899-1900].

Black and white advertisement for Fairbanks "Fairy Soap, " with a headshot of suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and her personal review of the product, published by the NK Fairbank Company.

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

“An Expurgated Bible,” Free Thought Magazine, December 1902

“An Expurgated Bible,” Free Thought Magazine, December 1902.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902)

“An Expurgated Bible,” Free Thought Magazine, December 1902.

Chicago, Illinois: H.L. Green, 1902.

Vol. XX, No. 12. of Free Thought Magazine featuring an article authored by Elizabeth Cady Stanton titled “An Expurgated Bible.” “…I suggest that inasmuch as the Bible degrades women, and in innumerable passages teachers her absolute subjection to man in all relations, in the State, the church, the home and the whole world of work, it is to her interest that the Bible in its present form, should be taken from the schools…or else to get out an expurgated edition of the Bible…”

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

“Elizabeth Cady Stanton,” The American Monthly Review of Reviews, XXVI

“Elizabeth Cady Stanton,” The American Monthly Review of Reviews, XXVI.

Ida Husted Harper (1851-1931)

“Elizabeth Cady Stanton,” The American Monthly Review of Reviews, XXVI.

New York: The Review of Review Company, July-December 1902.

Ida Husted Harper was an American author, journalist, columnist, and suffragist.  In 1896, Harper joined the National American Woman Suffrage Association. The next year, Susan B. Anthony asked Harper to come to New York to write her official biography.

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

The Woman’s Bible [Broadside]

The Woman’s Bible [Broadside].

The Woman’s Bible [Broadside].

Editor Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Carrie Chapman Catt, President of the National Suffrage Association, One of the Revising Committee.

Circa 1920-1925.

"This is the teaching of National Suffrage Leaders. Are you willing for women who hold these views to become political powers in our country?" Published in 1895, The Woman’s Bible attempted to redefine references pertaining to women and the denial of certain rights and privileges. Stanton added commentary beneath the quotations from quotes found in both Old and New Testaments.

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

Harriet Beecher Stowe [Cabinet Card]

Harriet Beecher Stowe [Cabinet Card].

Harriet Beecher Stowe [Cabinet Card].

Hartford, Connecticut: Rogers, no date.

Cabinet card bearing a near profile bust portrait of the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin.

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

A key to Uncle Tom's cabin: presenting the original facts and documents upon which the story is founded, together with corroborative statements verifying the truth of the work

A key to Uncle Tom's cabin: presenting the original facts and documents upon which the story is founded, together with corroborative statements verifying the truth of the work.

Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896)

A key to Uncle Tom's cabin: presenting the original facts and documents upon which the story is founded, together with corroborative statements verifying the truth of the work.

Boston: John P. Jewett & Company; Cleveland, Ohio: Jewett, Proctor & Worthington; London: Sampson Low, Son & Co., 1853.

After receiving accusations of misrepresenting slavery in her earlier publication Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Stowe published this work to document the veracity of the depiction of slavery in her novel.

From the collection of Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

The Great Orators
Orators pg. 3